Hours and Minutes Test

Why do Flight Attendants Need to Know how to Calculate Hours and Minutes?

Many of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) and flight attendant working agreement hours of service rules are based on time. hours and minutes testSince these work rules cannot be violated, you must become adept at adding and subtracting hours and minutes. For example, let’s say that your daily maximum on-duty period is 16 hours. Anything beyond 16 hours is illegal. Therefore, you’ll need to track your daily duty time. Furthermore, adding and subtracting hours and minutes is critical for tracking your monthly projection. If your contract allows you to fly a maximum of 85 hours per month, you’ll probably strive to reach this legal limit by month’s end. If you reach it, you’ll earn a full month. Anything less and you’ll deprive yourself of potential earnings.

Study your Hours and Minutes

The Hours and Minutes Study Guide is your best source for preparing for our Hours and Minutes test, in which we outline two strategies for calculating time.

Hours and Minutes Test

Adding hours and minutes may sound a lot easier than it is. If you’re a beginner, start by studying. The Hours and Minutes Study Guide is your best source for preparing for our Hours and Minutes test, in which we outline two strategies for calculating time.Then tackle the tests. There are five 20-questions multiple choice tests. Once you score 90% on a test (18 out of 20), you can move on. After you have achieved at least 90% on all five tests, you will be well prepared for this phase of flight attendant training.

Hours and minutes are displayed in the following format:

  • [hours] + [minutes]
  • Six hours and 35 minutes is written as 6+35.
  • Seventeen hours and twelve minutes is written as 17+12.

Note: None of the work rules depicted in the test apply to any specific airline.

Check Out Our Other Tests